Latest tour

Filter by: Popular

Shiraz

Desert & Seat
author04 6 Apr 2 min read

Isfahan

Nature vs. Nurture
author05 6 Apr 2 min read

Kashan

Tour & Trip
author02 7 Apr 5 min read

Yazd

Nutrition
author03 6 Apr 2 min read
Load more...
Stories for humans

Travel to Shiraz

author01 IranRo Tour 9 Apr 3 min read 12 comments 45 favorites

Shiraz | The Perfect Introduction To Iran

Shiraz.

When I think about this stunning city, it is honestly a miracle that my face doesn’t break from smiling so hard. Shiraz was the first city I visited in Iran, and jeez, what a way to start!

Shiraz is the 6th most populated city in Iran and the capital of the province of Fars. Located in the South-West of the country, it isn’t the typical jumping off point for backpackers (Tehran takes this crown) but I think it is the perfect place to start an Iranian adventure.

After arriving in the middle of the night and only managing to get about three hours of sleep (which is usually a disaster for someone who considers a 14 hour sleep the gold standard) I expected to spend my first day in Iran feeling exhausted and a little under the weather, but as it turned out, I was so excited to start exploring that not even a little sleep deprivation was gonna hold me back!

After waking up in a rather strange (in an endearing way) dorm room, I became fast friends with a Dutch traveller named Nicole who was set to depart Iran that evening. We spent the day slowly exploring a few Iranian gems and it was exactly what I needed to kick start what would turn out to be an unbelievable trip.

Our first stop was the Arg of Karim Khan – or what is more commonly referred to as ‘the citadel’. This citadel was commissioned by Karim Khan and dates back to the 1760s. Karim Khan ruled most regions in Iran from 1751 to 1779 and was the founder of the Zand dynasty. He commissioned this citadel to be used as his quarters, but over the years it has been used for many different things – at one stage it was even used as prison!

Entrance to the citadel costs 200,000 rial (approx $8) which is a pretty standard entry fee for sites of interest in Iran.

I really enjoyed visiting the citadel and found the architecture fascinating. It isn’t the sort of place where you’ll spend ages and ages though, so if you are backpacking on a super tight budget and only want to spend money on tickets for places where you will spend a lot of time, then the citadel may be something you want to skip. For me, $8 was a very reasonable price, but I did meet a lot of backpackers on a strict $20 per day budget who may not have been able to swing it.

After we had finished exploring the citadel, we tried to visit Vakil Mosque and Vakil Bazaar, but as we visited on a Friday they were both closed! This is not an uncommon thing in Iran, so make sure that if you have your heart set on visiting a place, it pays to try and do so on a day that isn’t Friday.

Even though we couldn’t go inside the Mosque, we could still look at it from the outside, and boy was it pretty!

Also located nearby is the Vakil Bathhouse. We snuck a quick peek inside and then decided that we would give it a miss. It would have been another 200,000 rials to enter and it looked incredibly kitschy. It was once a traditional bathhouse and is now full of creepy looking mannequins spread around the building to try and demonstrate how the bathhouse would have once looked. I like the idea in theory, but in practice it just didn’t really float my boat.

Once again though, the outside was seriously good looking.

Once we were done enjoying the free architecture, we decided to take a quick cab ride to the Eram Garden.

Eram Gardens and Qavam House (which lies inside the gardens) date back to at least the 13th century, with some evidence suggesting that a much less ornamental version of the gardens existed in this spot as early as the 11th century!

In the modern day, these vast and beautiful gardens are one of the 9 Persian Gardens that are considered a UNESCO World Heritage Site. They are a lovely and relaxed place to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city streets. Please note that though the gardens are a public site, entrance will still cost you 200,000 rial.

After Nicole and I were done relaxing in Eram Gardens, we had enough energy to see one more historic site before we desperately needed to refuel and eat!

As it turned out, the Tomb of Hafez wasn’t too far away, so this is where we headed.

This site is famous for being the final resting place of the famed Persian poet Hafez. This was hands down the busiest tourist attraction I visited in Shiraz, but it seemed to be full of more locals than foreigners. Once again, entrance will set you back a rather steep 200,000 rials.

The tomb and its memorial hall are undoubtedly pretty, but if you aren’t a history buff and are looking to save a few bucks, this is one place that you could possibly afford to give a miss.

After I was done at the tomb, it was time to devour some truly delicious Iranian cuisine and rest up in preparation for another big day of exploring.

THE  LOWDOWN 

Getting to Shiraz: Turkish Airlines fly between Shiraz and Istanbul regularly
Niyayesh Boutique Hotel: A cheap hotel with a few mixed dorms, expect to pay around $12/night
Arg of Karim Khan: Open most days, entrance is 200,000 rials
Eram Gardens: If you only visit one Persian garden in Shiraz, make it this one!
Hafez Tomb: For more information about the Tomb of Hafez, click here
Camera: Images captured with an Olympus OM-D E-M1 in conjunction with M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2/8 lens
Remember: Many mosques and religious sites are closed on Fridays – plan your time accordingly

Nature vs. Nurture

Travel to Isfahan

author05 IranRo Tour 6 Apr 2 min read 23 comments 253 favorites

Four Incredible Things To See and Do in Esfahan

When I arrived into Esfahan, I found myself with a little bit less time that I would’ve liked. Work was piling up and I literally had around 500 unread emails, which is borderline insanity inducing for a person who thinks that 20 unread emails is getting out of control! I couldn’t put my work to the side any longer, which meant that I was only really left with one day to explore Esfahan.

However, it turns out that you can still see quite a lot of incredible stuff with only one day!

These are the four places I chose to explore, all of which I’d highly recommend to anyone visiting Esfahan in the future.

Naqsh-e Jahan Square

Naqsh-e Jahan Square (also written as Naqshe Jahan) is one of the most well known public squares in Iran. Constructed between 1598 and 1629, it is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and even features on the 20,000 rials bank note!

This square is green, bright and surrounded by incredible examples of Iranian architecture (which we will get to a bit later) – making it the perfect place to escape from the hectic Esfahan streets, plonk your butt on a bench and enjoy watching the locals jaunt and cycle past you.

The next five photographs are my favourites from my wanderings through the square.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Imam Mosque

The Imam Mosque sits at the Southern side of Naqsh-e Jahan Square and has done so since the year 1629. Also known as Shah Mosque (pre Iranian Revolution) this incredible mosque is considered to be one of the finest architectural masterpieces in all of Iran.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

I arrived to the mosque mid-morning, and as I had started to run a little low on moolah, spent a little while hanging out in front of the entrance debating whether or not I was happy to hand over the 100,000 rials ($4 AUD) for the entrance ticket.

Whilst I was humming and hawing, a group of smiley young school kids walked past me up to the entrance, and it made for some pretty happy shots!

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking
How cute is the smiley fellow on the far left?

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

This man was also hanging out in front, and was more than happy to have his picture taken! He then encouraged me to go inside, and I ended up being so happy that I took his advice.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

I walked in to be greeted with this view!

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Already worth the $4 and I had barely even started exploring!

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

How incredible is this dome? It was a whole lot bigger than it looks too, hence why my 12-40mm lens couldn’t fit the entire thing in the one shot!esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Before I visited Iran, I must admit, I didn’t really find many architectural details that exciting, I was more of a ‘landscapes’ kinda gal. But honestly, even I had to suppress a squeal when I took this next shot – how bloody perfect does a structure want to be?

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

After had gotten my fill of Imam Mosque (unfathomable, I know) I exited to find a group of young school kids posing nervously for a photo – so cute!

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque

If you’ve ever flicked through a travel guide about Iran, then I would bet my left kidney that you have seen pictures of the interior dome of Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Construction of this mosque commenced in 1603 and was completed 16 years later in 1619. It was built by Persian architect Shaykh Bahai and has been referred to as the single most impressive example of Persian architecture.

Now, I don’t necessarily agree with this.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Now, I am not saying that it isn’t an impressive structure! But I saw so many incredible buildings whilst in Iran, I honestly think it would be impossible to name one of them ‘the best’.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

However, when looking at the dome, you can see how it would captivate people!

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Entrance to the mosque will set you back another 100,000 rials, which does seem a little steep considering that there isn’t much to see at this particular mosque other than the dome itself, but I am still incredibly glad I spent the money to see it.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Vank Cathedral

Vank Cathedral was a bit of a surprise for me! I had come to Iran expecting mosques and shrines, but an Armenian Cathedral? I had not expected that!

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Built in 1606, this cathedral was constructed for the hundreds of thousands of Armenian people that found themselves deported during the Ottoman War and who subsequently resettled in Iran.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

The cathedral is very much an amalgamation of cultures. It features a dome – something one would expect from an Iranian mosque, but also features numerous architectural features that one would expect to see in a more western church.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

Entrance to this cathedral is a rather steep 200,000 rials ($8 AUD) – but if you have seen enough mosques to last you a lifetime and are looking to shake things up a bit, then a trip to Vank Cathedral would be a worthwhile one.

esfahan-iran-blog-isfahan-travel-solo-backpacking

THE  LOWDOWN 

Getting to Esfahan: Kashan is well connected to Esfahan and Tehran via bus, but is only connected to Yazd via train
Amir Kabir Hostel: A cheap hotel with a few mixed dorms, expect to pay around $15/night
Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque: One of the most famous mosques in Iran, entrance will set you back $4 AUD
Camera: Images captured with an Olympus OM-D E-M1 in conjunction with M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2/8 lens
Remember: Esfahan and Isfahan are the same city, I still haven’t worked out which is the correct spelling!

Tour & Trip

Travel to KASHAN

author02 IranRo Tour 7 Apr 5 min read 5 comments 5 favorites

A Train Mishap + Arriving in Kashan

Travelling through Iran is generally a pretty easy process. There are a tonne of buses that connect through just about every Iranian city you could ever want to visit, and furthermore, these buses are cheap, comfortable and convenient. However, despite buses being easy, the most popular mode of transport in Iran (especially amongst locals) is via the train system.

So, while I backpacked through Iran, it was a given that I wanted to experience the train travel – at least once.

However, my little train journey in Iran did not exactly go to plan!

When buying train tickets in Iran you are required to go to a travel agent or ticket office with your passport and purchase them in person. Once at a travel agent, the agent takes your moolah and buys the tickets for you.

It is possible to buy tickets online, but this can be tricky for those doing so outside of Iran itself.

When I purchased my ticket, I very specifically requested that the ticket be for the afternoon train and the travel agent definitely got the memo, however, we were chatting away enthusiastically and I think this chatting may have distracted her somewhat.

When Hayden and I arrived at the train station the following day, there was a suspicious lack of other people waiting for the train. After around 30 minutes of waiting, a man approached myself and Hayden and informed us that the tickets we had purchased were for the train that had already left that morning, about 10 hours prior. Oh, and the afternoon train was fully booked.

Fark.

Luckily, we found someone to help us translate, and even more luckily, Hayden had kept the business card from the travel agency where we had booked our tickets. The train station employee was able to call this number, our situation was explained, and we were reassured that the manager would sort something out.

About twenty minutes later, the owner/manager of the travel agency had turned up to the train station and spoke with the train station manager.

The travel agent then negotiated to reimburse the train station for a new set of tickets, and also to pay a little sum of money to the conductor of the train as a thank you for accommodating us! We were told that we would be seated in the dining cart, but in the end we were put in a pair of really nice seats!

kashan-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpacking-eram-gardens

For the first hour of the trip I was half expecting someone to come and demand that we move from their seats, but eventually settled in to enjoy the journey – and what a journey it was! I absolutely love this next shot of the sunset taken from my seat window – not half bad at all!

kashan-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpacking-eram-gardens

Eventually we arrived in Kashan, and though I didn’t full in love with Kashan as much as I had with Shiraz and Yazd, there was still a tonne of incredible things to see and do.

On the day that I ventured to Abyaneh we happened to drive past a whole bunch of people marching through the streets. At first glance I wasn’t sure what was going on, but our driver soon explained that was a ‘march of mourning’ – for someone that had passed away.

kashan-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpacking-eram-gardens

kashan-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpacking-eram-gardens

Fin Gardens is another popular site of interest in Kashan. This traditional Persian garden is an incredibly well known UNESCO World Heritage Site due to the fact that it is where Amir Kabir – the Qajarid Chancellor – was assassinated in 1852.

kashan-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpacking-eram-gardens

Entrance to the gardens costs 200,000 rials – which is approximately $8 AUD.

kashan-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpacking-eram-gardens

The gardens are not the kinda place you could spend hours on end, but they lovely for a short respite from the dusty streets of Kashan.

kashan-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpacking-eram-gardens

The Kashan Bazaar is also very worth a visit. I wasn’t in the market to be buying any wares, but taking photographs of the incredible domed roof was pretty wonderful!

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

Also well worth a visit is the Agha Bozorg Mosque of Kashan. This small but memorable mosque is fairly new by Iranian standards (it only dates back to the 1800’s) and as a result, has a very different vibe to many of the other mosques that I visited whilst in Iran.

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

I mean, how many other mosques have motorcycles lined up inside them? Not very many!

iran-kashan-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

However, my absolute favourite place in all of Kashan ended up being the Aran va Bidgol Mosque. Located about a 20 minute drive outside of the Kashan City Centre, this mosque may not have looked like the most impressive one in the world, but I had a wonderful time there, so to me, it was pretty magical.

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

After donning my chador (a rather hideous pink and white floral one) I was allowed to enter the mosque grounds, and pretty much as soon as I did so, the clouds disappeared, the sun started shining, and the incredible blue and green colours on the dome and minarets really started to shine through.

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

I had a quick peek inside the mosque itself, but I hate not being able to take photographs, so after I snapped a few of the incredible mirrored walls and ceilings, I made my way back outside to admire the incredible external architecture.

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

I hadn’t been outside for too long before I found myself the object of attention for these smiling faces!

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

I am gonna go ahead and say it now – Iranian children are absolutely adorable! These three kiddos were a little bit obsessed with my camera, and kept gesturing for me to take their photograph and then giggling hysterically when I showed them the results! Meanwhile, their father just looked on smiling. It was pretty darn sweet!

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

The girl on the left of the next picture was also rather fascinated by something that I never would’ve expected. She didn’t speak much (if any) English, so it took a while for me to understand what she was trying to tell me! She kept pointing at the pink flowers on my chador, then pointing at my face and giggling! It wasn’t until I crouched down and she poked my cheek that I realised she was fascinated with my pink cheeks! How cute is that?

kashan-iran-travel-blog-backpacking-solo-female

Overall, Kashan probably won’t end up being the ‘favourite Iranian city’ for many people who visit Iran, bit that doesn’t mean that it isn’t still a seriously awesome place to wile away a few lovely days.

THE  LOWDOWN 

Getting to Kashan: Kashan is well connected to Esfahan and Tehran via bus, but is only connected to Yazd via train
Sadeghi House: A cheap hotel with a few mixed dorms, expect to pay around $15/night
Mosques: Most mosques in Kashan are free to enter, so if you are on a budget, this is a good place for you
Camera: Images captured with an Olympus OM-D E-M1 in conjunction with M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2/8 lens
Remember: Kashan is the only place I visited in Iran where I was bothered by mosquitoes – bring insect repellent!

 

Nutrition

Travel to YAZD

author03 IranRo Tour 6 Apr 2 min read 18 comments 125 favorites

Yazd: An Incredible City in The Desert

After spending four incredible days exploring Shiraz, I became a little bit worried that my Iranian adventure had started off too wonderful, and that everything following Shiraz would be a letdown.

Luckily, my next stop was Yazd, and it would turn out to be one of my favourite places in Iran.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide
Resident kitty at the Silk Road Hotel

Yazd city is the capital of the Yazd province and it is home to close to half a million people. Located a six hour bus ride North-East of Shiraz (and quite a pleasant one if you don’t find yourself having one of those days where you are constantly desperate to pee – there is a story there – but I will spare you all of the gory details) Yazd is an incredible example of an Iranian desert city, and one that should be on the bucket lists of anyone planning a visit to Iran.

After arriving into Yazd and checking into the Orient Hotel (a place which I would highly recommend) it didn’t take too long for me to meet with my first desert dwelling creature.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

Just chilling out in the Orient Hotel were three big tortoises! Just look at this little face, isn’t he/she sweet?

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

I spent almost three days in Yazd, and that was a perfect amount of time. I was able to do a day trip out to some incredible cities in the desert and still have plenty of time left over to explore some truly wonderful sites in the city itself.

The place in Yazd that I was most excited to visit was the pair of Zoroastrian Towers of Silence that lie around 10km outside of the city centre. Easily accessible by taxi, these towers are most beautiful when visited at sunset, as you will soon see!

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide
Image courtesy of Hayden from backpackertrack.com | Edited by Ellen Burne

So firstly, you may find yourself asking, “what on earth is a Zoroastrian Tower of Silence?”

This is a bloody good question.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide
Image courtesy of Hayden from backpackertrack.com | Edited by Ellen Burne

To begin, one needs to be aware that Zoroastrianism is one of the worlds oldest religions, with some historians believing that it was practiced as early as the 2nd century BC, but with most evidence suggesting that the religion came into existence in the 5th century.

Zoroastrian religion was suppressed in the 7th century following the Muslim conquest of Persia between 633-654 BC. In the present day, estimates suggest that as few as 2.6 million people worldwide practice the Zoroastrian faith – most of whom live in Iran and India.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

For those with Zoroastrian heritage or those who practice Zoroastrianism, Yazd is home to numerous places which are considered to be extremely important pilgrimage sites.

These Towers of Silence are among such sites.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

So we have lightly covered Zoroastrianism, but what about this “towers of silence” business?

The Towers of Silence is a name used to describe Zoroastrian structures that were – until the 1970’s – used for excarnation, which is an important part of the funerary process for Zoroastrian people.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

Excarnation is the process of leaving a dead body inside one of these open pits (pictured above) and allowing the elements and wildlife (typically scavenger birds such as vultures) to pick all of the flesh off of the bones.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide
Image courtesy of Hayden from backpackertrack.com | Edited by Ellen Burne

In the Zoroastrian faith, dead bodies are considered unclean and a potential source of contamination for anyone and anything that said dead body comes into contact with. As part of the Zoroastrain belief system, fire and earth are sacred and as a result, cremation and typical burial are considered ultimate no-no’s, as these would cause sacred elements to become contaminated.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide
Image courtesy of Hayden from backpackertrack.com | Edited by Ellen Burne

After the sun has dipped below the horizon, don’t be in too much of a rush to leave the grounds. Just below the towers are some incredible old buildings in various states of disrepair, and honestly, walking around amongst these structures made me feel like I had stumbled onto the set of Star Wars Episode IV!

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide
Image courtesy of Hayden from backpackertrack.com | Edited by Ellen Burne

Everywhere I turned there was something new and captivating to stare at and photograph.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide
Image courtesy of Hayden from backpackertrack.com | Edited by Ellen Burne

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

If you ever have a burning desire to pretend to be Luke Skywalker, this is an undeniably prime place to do so.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

Entrance to the Towers costs 150,000 rials (approx $6 AUD) and a cab ride from the city centre to the towers will set you back around 100,000 rials if you are comfortable with haggling. If you can find three other travellers to fill up the cab, it makes for a very cheap ride.

You can negotiate with a taxi driver to wait for you and return you back to the city centre, but it will most likely work out cheaper to do the return trip separately, and there will be taxis waiting outside to take people back to town.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

The following morning, it was time to do a little bit of semi-aimless wandering and exploring. Literally 30 metres down the road from my hotel was the Jame Mosque of Yazd, which may not be the biggest or most impressive mosque that one will ever see, but it is still very beautiful, and well worth a visit.

Plus, it is free to enter, which is always a bonus!

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

I really quite like this next photograph. I spotted this Iranian man opening up a bag of nuts and having a quick snack just in front of the Jame Mosque and for whatever reason, it just caught my eye.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

With a little bit more aimless walking, my new Iran travel buddy Hayden and I stumbled across an unassuming looking little mosque. I have no idea what it is called but boy, it may look understated from the outside, but it is pretty fricking magical on the inside.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

This next shot was taken by my friend Hayden, and honestly, it is probably one of my favourite photos from my time in Iran. I love the stained glass and the reflections off the tiles, and I really love how tiny I look next to the super high windows.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide
Image courtesy of Hayden from backpackertrack.com | Edited by Ellen Burne

Oh and the ceilings weren’t anything to sneeze at either!

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

This particular mosque was much more ‘local’ than all of the others that I had visited, and I only spotted one other foreigner in the entire time we were there.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

After I was done marvelling at the stained glass, it was back onto the streets for more exploring.

Check out this incredible bowl of spices that I spotted in a small store!

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

This next capture is another favourite from my Iran trip. Maybe it’s the sense of movement, or the spices, or that amazing pleather jacket, or maybe it is just that when I look at this picture I can hear all the sounds of the Yazd streets in my head. Whatever it is, there is just something I love about it.

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

Oh and y’know, here is another mosque… they certainly aren’t in short supply in Iran!

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

yazd-travel-blog-iran-solo-backpack-guide

Yazd is an absolutely incredible city. It is small but lively, it is friendly without being overwhelming, and there is so much incredible stuff to see and do.

Stay tuned to the next post to discover some incredible desert cities located not too far outside the Yazd city limits.

THE  LOWDOWN 

Getting to Yazd: Yazd is well connected to Esfahan, Tehran and Shiraz via local bus
Orient Hotel: A cheap hotel with a few mixed dorms, expect to pay around $15/night
Jame Mosque: Entrance to the mosque is free
Towers of Silence: Entrance to these amazing towers is 150,000 rials
Camera: Images captured with an Olympus OM-D E-M1 in conjunction with M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2/8 lens
Remember: The best time to visit the Towers of Silence is at sunset, and make sure you get there a bit beforehand to allow enough time to climb to the top of your chosen tower